Lakes Getaways – Holidays in the English Lake District. Book Direct and Save.

The best wild swimming site in the Southern Lakes

wild swimming

Paddling and Picnic Spots in the Lake District

Where is one of the  top wild swimming, river paddling and picnic spots in the Lake District?

  • Fell Foot Park, Bowness  and for an unusual way to travel to Fell Foot Park why not take the ferry from Lakeside to Fell Foot Park.

Wild swimming, paddling, river rope-swinging, picnics and the Lake District are all hot-day companions. Join Swallows and Amazons buccaneers, John, Susan, Titty, Bridget and Roger, in enjoying the best wild waterscape in the UK.

Fell Foot Park, Bowness

Sat on the shore of Lake Windermere, opposite Lakeside and Woodside cottage and only 15 minutes from Fell View Cottage.  You’ll find a National Trust café with baby changing, outdoor picnic benches and lots of grassy picnic blanket areas, rowing boats for hire, children’s adventure playground. But most importantly it has a beach-like access for splashing about in Lake Windermere

Woodside and Fell View . For Quality accommodation in the English lake District

www.lakesgetaways.co.uk

The Coolest way To Travel In The Lakes!

Coniston Water is nearly  five miles long, and has a maximum depth of 184 feet.  It is  the third largest of the lakes. It provided an important fish source for the monks of Furness Abbey who owned the lake and much of the surrounding land in the 13th and 14th Centuries. More recently Coniston Water was used to transport slate and ore from the many mines worked in the Coppermines Valley above Coniston village. It has three small islands, all owned by the National Trust.

The elegant Victorian Steam Yacht Gondola sails between March and November. Renovated by the National Trust, its passengers can travel in opulently upholstered saloons – a superb way to appreciate the magnificent scenery. The traditional timber craft of Coniston Launch provide regular hourly sailings throughout the year to jetties around Coniston Water, including Brantwood.

The Victorian philosopher John Ruskin bought Brantwood house to the east of the lake in 1871 declaring the view over the lake to ‘The Old Man of Coniston’ to be ‘the best in all of England’.

Arthur Ransome based his book ‘Swallows and Amazons’ on Coniston Water, and much fun may be had trying to discover the locations of the stories. There are both boat hire and sailing courses & centres on Coniston Water.

Sir Malcolm Campbell chose Coniston for his attempt at the water speed record in 1939, which he achieved at over 141 miles per hour. On his death, his son Donald Campbell [left] took up where his father left off.
His aim was to better 300 miles per hour, which he did on 4th January 1967, but the craft, ‘Bluebird’, shot up into the air and disappeared into the lake. Until early in 2001, his body had never been found. There is a memorial to him near the Information Centre in Ruskin Avenue. The story is told in the refurbished Ruskin Museum.

The Ruskin Museum has a display of Donald Campbell memorabilia, and is home to the actual tail fin of K7, as well as the air intake of the Bristol Orpheus engine recovered in 2001. A project is under way to restore K7, aimed at returning Bluebird to Coniston before permanently housing her at the Ruskin museum.

On 8 March 2001, Bluebird was raised from the bed of Coniston Water, on 28 May the remains of what was later proved to be Campbell’s body were brought from the lake. A memorial service was held in Coniston church on 12 September 2001, and his body buried in the churchyard.

At the Lakeland Motor Museum is the ‘Campbell Legend Bluebird Exhibition’ featuring the exploits of Sir Malcolm Campbell and his son Donald Campbell.

A Great Walk With A Dog near Newby Bridge

Sitting on bench above High Dam

One of the best walks in the Central Lakes is up to, and around High Dam.It’s a lake that was much favoured by Wainwright. In fact he said “It is far superior to Tarn Hows” High praise indeed!
It’s a picturesque tarn near Finsthwaite and Lakeside at the southern end of Windermere. A dam was built across the southern end of the tarn in the early 1800s to supply water to the bobbin mill at Stott Park a few miles away. It is surrounded by mixed woodlands of oak, birches, larch and Scots pine to name a few that we spotted. The woodland floor is scattered with bilberry, bracken and heather.
High Dam is a circular route that can be extended up to Stott Park Heights which will afford you a view down on to Lake Windermere.

I Found Some Wonderful Artwork near Newby Bridge

 If you’re looking for arts and crafts a trip to Yew Tree Barn at High Newton just off the A590 is well worth a visit.

Book Launch at Yew Tree Barn – 18th January

Please make a note in your diaries of this January event.  Yew Tree Barn are  hosting the launch of local poet David Hunt’s new book, ‘Inklings’, which will be hot off the press for his book signing on Thursday 18th January.

Please email or call to book tickets.

A visit to Yew Tree Barn is not complete unless you have a browse around the barn, or a visit to  Harry’s Cafe Bar. Their coffee is fantastic, there’s an interesting wine list, wherever possible they buy locally, everything is freshly cooked, there is a cosy seating area by the fire with newspapers and magazines, free wifi, and you will be very well looked after!

At the beginning of December, the barn holds its annual Christmas Fair. Watch the video to get a flavour of Yew Tree Barn.