Lakes Getaways – Holidays in the English Lake District

The top 5 places to visit in the Southern lake District

High Dam in Summer

1.Windermere Lake Cruises 

There are many great days out that can be reached by boat on Windermere with Windermere Lake Cruises. Dogs on leads travel free on all boats, including the self-drive and rowing boats, and it turns out they even get a ticket of their own!

No Lake District holiday is complete without a lake cruise of some description, and with Windermere Lake Cruises you can enjoy a tour of the lake on one of its main ‘steamers’, Swan, Teal, or Tern, or travel on one of its smaller vessels to selected destinations. Dogs are welcome free of charge! 015394 43360, windermere-lakecruises.co.uk

View of lake Windermere
View of Lake Windermere
  1. The Lakeside and Haverthwaite Railway

The southern tip of Windermere is home to the Lakeside and Haverthwaite Railway, where you can take a ride on a steam locomotive, complete with 1950s carriages, as it makes its way along 3.5 miles of the former Furness Railway branch line. As Windermere Lake Cruises and the railway connect at Lakeside, consider buying a combined ticket to travel by both boat and rail – dogs travel free of charge on the railway too! 015395 31594, lakesiderailway.co.uk

Lakes Getaways Haverthwaite_Station
Haverthwaite to Lakeside Steam Railway

3.Stott Park Bobbin Mill, Finsthwaite Across the road from Woodside Cottage

The only working bobbin mill left in the Lake District, English Heritage’s Stott Park Bobbin Mill gives you a great sense of the area’s industrial history.

Dogs on leads are welcome to explore the site along with their owners at Stott Park Bobbin Mill. Stott Park Bobbin Mill is an industrial museum which explains the process of bobbin making in the Lake District. Visitors can book a guided tour of the mill to see how a wooden bobbin is made.. There’s also a lovely walk nearby to High Dam, a man-made tarn which once fed the mill.

Stott Park Bobbin Mill
Stott Park Bobbin Mill
  1. Grizedale Forest

The Forestry Commission’s Grizedale Forest is a great place to walk with your dog, and has several waymarked trails for all tastes and abilities. The forest is most famous for its outdoor sculptures, with around 40 artworks to be found along its network of pathways. Dogs are also welcome inside Grizedale’s café. 0300 067 4495, forestry.gov.uk/grizedale

Grizedale has everything for a great family day out.  Located to the east of Coniston Water and to the south of Hawkshead (15 minutes for Woodside) Set in the heart of the Lake District National Park, Grizedale offers an unrivalled day out for everyone.

Sculpture trails, picnic areas, forest way marked trails, (Riddings Wood is push chair/wheel chair friendly) Gruffalo Trail , mountain bike trails, Mountain bike hire but book in advance!, excellent café/tearoom. Go Ape Tree Top Adventure, Zip Trekking Adventure Forest Segway,

Have fun in Grizedale !#

Grizedale Forest
Grizedale Forest

5.Backbarrow Motor museum Address: Old Blue Mill, Backbarrow, Ulverston LA12 8TA

A nostalgic visit suitable for all ages, this museum is located in Backbarrow, on the site of the former Backbarrow Blue Mill – best known for manufacturing the washing additive, Dolly Blue. Well-behaved dogs are welcome throughout the exhibition areas free of charge, but do note that Café Ambio next door doesn’t accept dogs.

30,000 exhibits that trace the development of road transport throughout the twentieth century – cycles, motorbikes, motor cars and automobilia.

Housed in a converted mill in the heart of the Lake District, we’re minutes from Lake Windermere and offer joint tickets with Windermere Lake Cruises and other local attractions.

Much more than just a motor museum, our local history and period shopping displays, authentic recreations and picturesque riverside cafe makes it a great day out for the whole family.

Vintage cars at Backbarrow
Vintage cars at Backbarrow

OPEN 9:30am to 4:30pm   every day except Christmas Day

The Lakeland Historic Car Club meet on the first Saturday of every month at the museum and Cafe Ambio. Everyone is welcome to attend whether you’re an owner, enthusiast or just keen to see some great examples of some classic local cars.

For quality accommodation www.lakesgetaways.co.uk

A Recommended Day Trip near Cartmel

Laurel and Hardy Statue

A great trip out from Cartmel but in fact any destination in the Lake District at the moment is a trip to Ulverston.

Ulverston is not only a delightful market town with interesting shops and antique stores, but is also the home of a small, but perfectly formed and most informative museum!  Ulverston is the home of the Laurel and Hardy Museum, which seeing at the film “Stan and Ollie” has just come out ( January 2019) I thought I would share this lovely town with you all.

Mural of Stan Laurel

First a little history about the duo.  Laurel and Hardy were a comedy act during the early Classical Hollywood era of American cinema. Stan Laurel was English (1890–1965) and Oliver Hardy American (1892–1957). They became well known during the late 1920s to the mid-1940s for their slapstick comedy.  Laurel played the clumsy and childlike friend of the self- important Hardy. They are famous for their signature tune which was played over their film credits  (The Dance of the Cuckoos”). their bowler hats!

Prior to emerging as a team, both actors had well-established film careers. Laurel had appeared in over 50 films as an actor (while also working as a writer and director), while Hardy had been in more than 250 productions. They didn’t become a comedy team until 1926 when they appeared in a movie short together, and they officially became a team in 1927 when they appeared together in the silent short film Putting Pants on Philip.

 

They appeared as a team in 107 films, starring in 32 short silent films, 40 short sound films, and 23 full-length feature films. They also made 12 guest or cameo appearances .

In 2005, they were voted the seventh-greatest comedy act of all time by a UK poll of fellow comedians.

The official Laurel and Hardy appreciation society is known as  The Sons of the Desert and memorabilia of them and their work can be found in Ulverston.

Ulverston is the home of Stan Laurel and at the Roxy Cinema not only can you at the moment (January 2019) see the film, “Stan and Ollie” with   John C. Reilly and Steve Coogan you can tour the delightful museum dedicated to the famous pair

To get to the museum by Car –(from Woodside or Fell View)

Turn off the M6 at Junction 36, follow the A590 to Barrow in Furness, which will bring you to Ulverston. The easiest car park is situated on the roundabout at the entrance to the town. From the car park, we are a short walk up the cobbled street, past Gillam’s Tearoom, turn left at Costa Coffee onto Brogden Street. Their  entrance is at the front of the Roxy Cinema, look out for the smiling Stan, as in the photo above!

Parking –

There is ample parking in Ulverston town centre with several Pay and Display car parks all within 5 minutes walk. Parking on the street is usually limited to 1 hour unless you have a parking permit (local residents only).

Admission Prices 2019

Adults: £5.00
Concession: £4.00 Children: £2.50
Family Ticket: £10.00 (Family Ticket consists of Two Adults and up to Three Children U16)
Deluxe Ticket: £7.00 (Entry plus Hot or Cold Drink and muffin or bag of popcorn)

Annual Passes:
Adult: £12.00
Concession: £10.00
Family: £25.00 Ulverston Walking Tour: £5.00 per person

Every Thursday during the School Summer Holidays
Join our experts for a guided tour of Ulverston as Stan would have remembered it. See his birthplace, the shop where Grandma bought him his Beers Treacle Toffee (a real treat!) and many other parts of our charming Market Town.

Opening Times

10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Easter – Oct: 7 Days Per Week
Close Monday & Wednesday at all other times.
Christmas Opening Times: From 20th Dec to 3rd Jan,

Looking for quality accommodation in the English lake District? Look no further, check out www.lakesgetaways.co.uk

Scenic Cartmel to Holker Hall Bike Ride

Humphrey Head Beach

Cartmel to Humphrey Head & Holker Hall  Cycle Ride

This short ride has a bit of everything- the delights of Cartmel with its Priory, lovely square and range of cafes, pubs and restaurants, a chance to walk to the end of Humphrey Head for spectacular views of Morecambe Bay and the option to visit the splendid house and gardens at Holker Hall. The ride heads due south from Cartmel, climbing gently then dropping steeply to cross the B5277 and passing Wraysholme Tower. Stay on your bike and follow the road to its end at the edge of the bay, however, on a fine day it’s worth locking up your bike and walking out to Humphrey Head for the view. Back on your bike through Flookburgh to The Green from where you have the option to visit Holker Hall. From Holker Hall you can take an off road route directly back to Cartmel racecourse or re-join the main route at The Green for a tarmac option back to the start.

Points of interest along the way

Wraysholm Tower -South of Allithwaite village is the 15th century three storey stone tower house Wraysholme Tower. It is rectangular in shape, with a small projecting garderobe tower at the south-east corner. At roof level are the remains of a parapet and three corner turrets, with the site of a later hall covered by a 19th century farmhouse.
It’s in good condition as English Heritage have replaced the roof – it now has a steepled roof, rather than the flat one it originally had – and they have repaired a gable wall that was cracking and falling away from the main body of the tower. One of the spiral staircases still stands.
The rough limestone tower, rectangular in shape, which is 39ft high, has walls some 4ft thick, bonded together with a mixture of lime & bullocks blood.
The hall is believed to have been built by the Harrington family of Gleaston, of which Sir James Harrington supported Richard III during the war of the Roses, culminating in his estates being seized and given to the Stanleys, later to become ‘The Earls of Derby’.
Wraysholme Tower is visible from the road that runs along side the farm, but is on private property, and as it’s actually part of the farm you’re not able to get close at all.

Humphrey Head 

With excellent views over Morecambe Bay, this limestone promontory has an unusual assemblage of plants and interesting geological exposures. Great place for watching birds on the estuary.

Holker Hall

Fabulous home of the Cavendish family, and parkland, gardens and home are open to the public

Route Information

Short day – will take most of the day but you will be able to start late in the morning or finish early in the afternoon.
Tracks, bridleways and single track through valleys or over low fells. Route alignment is clear but you might need to identify turns or junctions.
Nearly all rideable but might have to dismount for the odd ford or rough bit.
OS map Landranger97 Explorer OL97
Toilets Cartmel, Flookburgh, Holker Hall
Refreshments Lots of choice in Cartmel.

Route Essentials

Cycle Route: Cartmel-Flookburgh-Cartmel

Duration: 1.5-3 hours

Miles: 8

Route Details

  1. From the square in Cartmel head towards the Priory, past the Kings Arms pub.2. At the cross roads (Give Way) on the edge of the village go straight ahead (sign posted Allithwaite, Grange)3. After ½ mile, on a sharp left hand bend, bear right, (signposted Templand)

    4. Gentle climb. On descent, on another sharp left hand bend, bear right on Templand Lane (NB not sharp right to Boarbank Hall)

    5. At cross roads (Give Way) with B5277 go straight ahead (signposted Holy Well 1 ¾ , Humphrey Head 1 ½ )

    6. At T junction, shortly after the level crossing, turn left (no sign)

    7. Follow this road to its end at the tip of Humphrey Head for fine views of Morecambe Bay. For better views still, lock up your bikes near the Field Centre (signposted up to the left off the road to the coast about ¾ mile after the level crossing) and walk along the top of Humphrey Head.

    8. Retrace your route. At the first road junction follow the road to the Left.

    9. At the T junction at the end of willow lane turn right (Sticky Toffee Pudding Factory ahead).

    10. At the T junction with Market street in the centre of Flookburgh turn right then after 200 yards turn left onto Green Lane, just before the Crown Inn.

    11. After ½ mile, at the T junction with a stone wall and house ahead turn right then shortly left, (signposted Cartmel)

    12. After just over 1 mile, turn right at the T junction then after 400 yds take the first left (signposted Cartmel Priory) to return to the square.

    Option to visit Holker Hall.
    After ½ mile at the t junction with stone wall and house ahead, turn L. At the next T junction turn right then after 50 yards turn left uphill through a gate.

    A. Go through another gate. At T-junction with a wooden Bridleway sign ahead and a track to your right, turn sharp left uphill.

    B. Emerge on the B5278 opposite Holker Hall. Cross with care and proceed along the road opposite to the Hall. (there is no entrance fee to pay if you just wish to visit the café)

    Retrace your route from Holker Hall, (take care crossing the B5278) on to minor lane opposite and, climbing steeply, follow the road for ¾ mile to the end of tarmac.

    C. Follow the outward route , turning sharp right on the tarmac lane between stone walls and follow through two gates to return to The Green at point 11. Bear left the shortly after left again at the next T junction ( signposted Cartmel 1 ¼ ) Follow route instruction 12 to return to Cartmel.

    www.lakesgetaways.co.uk

    For quality accommodation in the Lake District stay at Woodside Cottage

  2. Woodside 2018

Walking in crisp Autumn air, enjoying nature, fabulous colours. It’s the Lake District!

Grizedale Forest, (15 mins from Woodside and 30 mins from Fell View)  in the heart of the Lake District, offers an unrivalled day out for everyone.

You can find walking & cycling trails or simply discover a quiet spot to admire the wildlife, amazing sculptures, a place to relax and enjoy some great food.  Grizedale Forest is famous for its outdoor sculptures. Since 1977 leading international artists have created sculpture in response to Grizedale Forest’s unique environment, establishing the first collection of site-specific art in the UK.

Now around 40 sited artworks are located across the forest, linked by the network of walking and cycling trails. The sculptures provide moments of contemplation and a special way of navigating this extraordinary landscape.

pixel2013 / Pixabay

 Grizedale Forest is celebrating its 50th Anniversary of Arts and Culture from 24th May – 23rd Sept 2018,

‘Inspired by Nature’ is the result of a special collaboration between Royal Society of Sculptors and The Forestry Commission to celebrate 50-years of art in the forest.

From pine needles to marble, bronze and wood, this exhibition of 9 artists’ works invites visitors to “experience the natural world through the thoughts and ideas of the artists who have produced the works in the exhibition.”

The event is taking place in the heart of the South Lakes, on the site of the old Grizedale Hall, where the impressive architect-designed Grizedale Forest Resource Centre now stands. With globally-acclaimed artists such as Richard Long and Andy Goldsworthy finding inspiration in this forest, Grizedale has gained an international reputation for being at the forefront of the Environmental Art movement.

Other autumn events at Grizedale Forest to look out for:

  • Autumn Stargazing at Grizedale Forest, Friday 7 September 2018, 8.30pm-10.30pm.
  • The Art of the Woodsman at Grizedale Forest, Sunday 16 September 2018.
  • A 1-mile Highway Rat Activity Trail takes the youngest members of the family on an interactive journey through the forest.
  • Mountain bikes can be hired
  • Go Ape through the forest

morecambe bay cycle route