Lakes Getaways – Holidays in the English Lake District

A walk to the Lord’s Seat

Walking Whitbarrow Scar

Whitbarrow is a hillnot far away from Fell View and Woodside . Designated a biological Site of Special Scientific Interest[1][2] and national nature reserve, it forms part of the Morecambe Bay Pavements Special Area of Conservation due to its supporting some of the best European examples of natural limestone habitats. Also known as Whitbarrow Scar (though properly that term applies to the cliffs lining its western edge), the hill lies about 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) south-west of Kendal, just north of the A590 road, close to the village of Witherslack.[3] Part of the site is a local nature reserve called Whitbarrow Scar.[4][5]

It is a mixture of woodland with good paths.  The hill is easily seen from the A590 with its steep limestone cliffs.

The summit of Whitbarrow Scar is known as Lord’s Seat, and an anticlockwise walk to here from Witherslack, returning along the valley to the west, forms a chapter in The Outlying Fells of Lakeland by Alfred Wainwright. He describes it as “the most beautiful [walk] in this book; beautiful it is every step of the way. … All is fair to the eye on Whitbarrow.”[6]

The walk:

The small hamlet of Mill Side is the easiest place to start this walk. There is an informal layby just across the cattle grid from the A590 – signed Beck Head and Mill Side – where half-a-dozen cars may park.

For full details of the walk and maps follow the link https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_202.html

For quality accommodation in the Lake District, please check out our cottages www.lakesgetaways.co.uk

Scenic Cartmel to Holker Hall Bike Ride

Humphrey Head Beach

Cartmel to Humphrey Head & Holker Hall  Cycle Ride

This short ride has a bit of everything- the delights of Cartmel with its Priory, lovely square and range of cafes, pubs and restaurants, a chance to walk to the end of Humphrey Head for spectacular views of Morecambe Bay and the option to visit the splendid house and gardens at Holker Hall. The ride heads due south from Cartmel, climbing gently then dropping steeply to cross the B5277 and passing Wraysholme Tower. Stay on your bike and follow the road to its end at the edge of the bay, however, on a fine day it’s worth locking up your bike and walking out to Humphrey Head for the view. Back on your bike through Flookburgh to The Green from where you have the option to visit Holker Hall. From Holker Hall you can take an off road route directly back to Cartmel racecourse or re-join the main route at The Green for a tarmac option back to the start.

Points of interest along the way

Wraysholm Tower -South of Allithwaite village is the 15th century three storey stone tower house Wraysholme Tower. It is rectangular in shape, with a small projecting garderobe tower at the south-east corner. At roof level are the remains of a parapet and three corner turrets, with the site of a later hall covered by a 19th century farmhouse.
It’s in good condition as English Heritage have replaced the roof – it now has a steepled roof, rather than the flat one it originally had – and they have repaired a gable wall that was cracking and falling away from the main body of the tower. One of the spiral staircases still stands.
The rough limestone tower, rectangular in shape, which is 39ft high, has walls some 4ft thick, bonded together with a mixture of lime & bullocks blood.
The hall is believed to have been built by the Harrington family of Gleaston, of which Sir James Harrington supported Richard III during the war of the Roses, culminating in his estates being seized and given to the Stanleys, later to become ‘The Earls of Derby’.
Wraysholme Tower is visible from the road that runs along side the farm, but is on private property, and as it’s actually part of the farm you’re not able to get close at all.

Humphrey Head 

With excellent views over Morecambe Bay, this limestone promontory has an unusual assemblage of plants and interesting geological exposures. Great place for watching birds on the estuary.

Holker Hall

Fabulous home of the Cavendish family, and parkland, gardens and home are open to the public

Route Information

Short day – will take most of the day but you will be able to start late in the morning or finish early in the afternoon.
Tracks, bridleways and single track through valleys or over low fells. Route alignment is clear but you might need to identify turns or junctions.
Nearly all rideable but might have to dismount for the odd ford or rough bit.
OS map Landranger97 Explorer OL97
Toilets Cartmel, Flookburgh, Holker Hall
Refreshments Lots of choice in Cartmel.

Route Essentials

Cycle Route: Cartmel-Flookburgh-Cartmel

Duration: 1.5-3 hours

Miles: 8

Route Details

  1. From the square in Cartmel head towards the Priory, past the Kings Arms pub.2. At the cross roads (Give Way) on the edge of the village go straight ahead (sign posted Allithwaite, Grange)3. After ½ mile, on a sharp left hand bend, bear right, (signposted Templand)

    4. Gentle climb. On descent, on another sharp left hand bend, bear right on Templand Lane (NB not sharp right to Boarbank Hall)

    5. At cross roads (Give Way) with B5277 go straight ahead (signposted Holy Well 1 ¾ , Humphrey Head 1 ½ )

    6. At T junction, shortly after the level crossing, turn left (no sign)

    7. Follow this road to its end at the tip of Humphrey Head for fine views of Morecambe Bay. For better views still, lock up your bikes near the Field Centre (signposted up to the left off the road to the coast about ¾ mile after the level crossing) and walk along the top of Humphrey Head.

    8. Retrace your route. At the first road junction follow the road to the Left.

    9. At the T junction at the end of willow lane turn right (Sticky Toffee Pudding Factory ahead).

    10. At the T junction with Market street in the centre of Flookburgh turn right then after 200 yards turn left onto Green Lane, just before the Crown Inn.

    11. After ½ mile, at the T junction with a stone wall and house ahead turn right then shortly left, (signposted Cartmel)

    12. After just over 1 mile, turn right at the T junction then after 400 yds take the first left (signposted Cartmel Priory) to return to the square.

    Option to visit Holker Hall.
    After ½ mile at the t junction with stone wall and house ahead, turn L. At the next T junction turn right then after 50 yards turn left uphill through a gate.

    A. Go through another gate. At T-junction with a wooden Bridleway sign ahead and a track to your right, turn sharp left uphill.

    B. Emerge on the B5278 opposite Holker Hall. Cross with care and proceed along the road opposite to the Hall. (there is no entrance fee to pay if you just wish to visit the café)

    Retrace your route from Holker Hall, (take care crossing the B5278) on to minor lane opposite and, climbing steeply, follow the road for ¾ mile to the end of tarmac.

    C. Follow the outward route , turning sharp right on the tarmac lane between stone walls and follow through two gates to return to The Green at point 11. Bear left the shortly after left again at the next T junction ( signposted Cartmel 1 ¼ ) Follow route instruction 12 to return to Cartmel.

    www.lakesgetaways.co.uk

    For quality accommodation in the Lake District stay at Woodside Cottage

  2. Woodside 2018

A secret haven for wildlife in the Lakes

When you’re next in the Lakes you really must visit this very special Nature Reserve.

is a gem. It is a private reserve and is open to members, but at only £10, it is a small payment to enjoy peace and tranquillity!

Membership of the Hay Bridge Society is open to anyone with an interest in wildlife and the natural world. Single membership costs £10 per annum, and family membership costs £15. Members can visit the Reserve as often as they wish during daylight hours, either to walk around the Reserve, or make use of the car park and walk in the valley surrounding the Reserve, or just to sit by the study centre and enjoy the peace and quiet. It is actually quite amazing what a wealth of wildlife can often be seen from the Study Centre terrace, without walking anywhere. Part of the terrace is roofed, so you can even sit out when it is raining if you so choose.
Non-members can enjoy this reserve for a £2 donation and in autumn will be in for a treat.
There are drink making facilities and toilets accessible at all times and, of course, the Study Centre itself is open when the Warden is on site.

HOURS OF ACCESS: Members may visit the reserve at any time during hours of daylight (6am to 9pm in the summer) without prior arrangement and are welcome to bring their friends.
Serious wildlife watchers are very welcome to come earlier or later than this, but for security reasons, please call and arrange it with the Warden beforehand, as we need to advise the occupants of both Low Hay and High Hay so they know who you are. People wandering around at dawn and dusk might be mistaken for poachers!

CARS: Please leave your car in the Members’ car park, displaying your car park ticket on the dashboard. The road is very narrow and cars parked on the verges, or in passing places can cause problems for others.

Just follow the signs to Bouth off A590.  At Bouth turn right at the White Hart Inn follow this road for about 1/2 mile to find the sign for Hay Bridge only, follow the lane until you reach the car park at the end.
skeeze / Pixabay
This is a haven for wildlife lovers and autumn is a very special time of year to visit. Red Deer have long roamed the Furness Fells and this reserve provides a safe haven for them and lots of other wildlife, including Buzzard’s, Hawks, bats, dragonfly, damsel and beautiful butterflies.
adege / Pixabay
Fungi are particularly abundant and put on a wonderful display in late summer and autumn. For experts, expect the hedgehog (a tooth fungus), the orange birch bolete, as well as many milkcaps and brittlegills. From early October you are likely to also hear the roars of Deer Rutting.

DOGS: Well behaved dogs are allowed on the Reserve, but they must be kept on a short lead at all times.

MEMBERS’ FACILITIES: These are situated on the lower side of the building (the last door on the right at the far end of the lower terrace). There are two toilets, including one for wheelchair users, and hand washing facilities. There is also a rest area, with kettle, tea and coffee etc. available for members’ use, together with chairs, information and the Log Book. Please record your sightings – they are very useful for our wildlife records. This area is always open for your use, please leave it clean and tidy, switch off the kettle and all lights and close the door when you leave.

adege / Pixabay

THE STUDY CENTRE: Originally a traditional Lakeland Stone Barn, the Study Centre was converted into a Deer Museum and Naturalists Study in the early 1970’s. In 2007, it underwent refurbishment to form a Study Centre and Interpretation Centre for all the flora and fauna to be found on the Reserve. It now houses information, field guides, species lists and exhibits relevant to Hay Bridge, and is for use by visiting schools, groups and Society members.
The study centre is usually open when the Warden is on site. You are more than welcome to use the field guides on the Reserve, but please return them to the Study Centre before you leave the Reserve. Equipment i.e., collection pots, magnifying glasses, microscopes, dipping nets, bat detector, moth trap etc) are available for use by arrangemen

http://www.haybridgereserve.org.uk/

Quality accommodation in the English Lake District www.lakesgetaways.co.uk

Walking in crisp Autumn air, enjoying nature, fabulous colours. It’s the Lake District!

Grizedale Forest, (15 mins from Woodside and 30 mins from Fell View)  in the heart of the Lake District, offers an unrivalled day out for everyone.

You can find walking & cycling trails or simply discover a quiet spot to admire the wildlife, amazing sculptures, a place to relax and enjoy some great food.  Grizedale Forest is famous for its outdoor sculptures. Since 1977 leading international artists have created sculpture in response to Grizedale Forest’s unique environment, establishing the first collection of site-specific art in the UK.

Now around 40 sited artworks are located across the forest, linked by the network of walking and cycling trails. The sculptures provide moments of contemplation and a special way of navigating this extraordinary landscape.

pixel2013 / Pixabay

 Grizedale Forest is celebrating its 50th Anniversary of Arts and Culture from 24th May – 23rd Sept 2018,

‘Inspired by Nature’ is the result of a special collaboration between Royal Society of Sculptors and The Forestry Commission to celebrate 50-years of art in the forest.

From pine needles to marble, bronze and wood, this exhibition of 9 artists’ works invites visitors to “experience the natural world through the thoughts and ideas of the artists who have produced the works in the exhibition.”

The event is taking place in the heart of the South Lakes, on the site of the old Grizedale Hall, where the impressive architect-designed Grizedale Forest Resource Centre now stands. With globally-acclaimed artists such as Richard Long and Andy Goldsworthy finding inspiration in this forest, Grizedale has gained an international reputation for being at the forefront of the Environmental Art movement.

Other autumn events at Grizedale Forest to look out for:

  • Autumn Stargazing at Grizedale Forest, Friday 7 September 2018, 8.30pm-10.30pm.
  • The Art of the Woodsman at Grizedale Forest, Sunday 16 September 2018.
  • A 1-mile Highway Rat Activity Trail takes the youngest members of the family on an interactive journey through the forest.
  • Mountain bikes can be hired
  • Go Ape through the forest

morecambe bay cycle route

How to have an amazing experience in colour!

If you want to experience a World Heritage site in all its glory, get yourself to Claife Heights Viewing station on the banks of Lake Windermere.

By road  …Junction 36 off M6, then take A684 which becomes the A591 to Windermere and Ambleside. B5285 from Windermere via Windermere ferry 3 miles. B5286 and B5285 from Ambleside 9 miles. B5285 from Coniston 8 miles.

Parking: Ash Landing, very near Claife Viewing Station and Harrowslack, on Windermere’s west shore.

There’s a cosy cafe in the courtyard and it is open every day 11am-3pm.  Four legged friends are welcome on the west shore of Windermere.

This colourful Viewing Station has endless lake views and waterside paths for you to explore.

 

 

Why Not Take A Snowdrop Walk In The Beauty Of The Lakes?

Snowdrop Walk

Time: Open at 11am and close at 3pm

Venue: Brockhole – The Lake District Visitor Centre, Windermere, Cumbria LA23 1LJ

Entry Fees: Free Entry. Car parking charges apply

Costs: Snowdrops – £2.00 and Children’s Treasure Trail – £1.00

Brockhole is available for you to walk around at your leisure with the addition of a children’s Treasure Hunt where they receive a fun-filled goody bag at the end.

Snowdrops are available for purchase on the day and charity staff and volunteers will be on hand to help with the planting at a dedicated area within the park.

Refreshments will be available from on site cafe that has stunning views of Lake Windermere.

Booking isn’t required, please just turn up on the day between 11am and 3pm.

Unusual Things You Can See near Newby Bridge

My thanks to https://where2walk.co.uk/lake_district/gummers-how/

 A Great Walk With A Great View!

Start Point: SD 389876. There is a small car park on the Fell Foot side road 1 mile north of Newby Bridge.
Height to Climb: 88ms (289 feet)
Terrain: An easy path to the summit and back but a myriad of smaller paths offer great opportunities to explore and vary the route.
Eating & Drinking: There is nothing nearer than Newby Bridge but the outcrops make great picnic spots

Gummers How walk map

Gummer’s How walk

Access is from the Fell Foot Brow road from the southern end of Windermere off the A592. There is a small car park before you get to Sow How Lane if you are coming up from the lake. The path is well trodden and easy to follow, although eroded in places, so watch for small diversions whilst the landscape recovers.

Although not detailed, this map will give you a rough idea of how far the walk is from the road and you will see that from gaining a little height you will have access to views across Windermere and to the fells beyond – quite breath taking.

Wainwright neglected to include Gummer’s How in his 7 main guides, probably due to its insignificant height (less than 400 foot of climbing), but added it later to his Outlying Fells collection. His amusing description here challenges any walker to reach the summit but if they fail to he suggests the potential climber invests in pipe and slippers rather than walking boots! It is simple, can take no more than 1/2 an hour up and down but is worthy of greater exploration. Little rocky outcrops and heather clad slopes are the order of the day on Gummer’s How. It offers great views both up Windermere and also down beyond Newby Bridge to the sea. With nothing else of any interest on the east shoreline of Windermere Gummer’s How is a real find and should be included for all who stay in the area.

Recommend: Although Wainwright talks of the elderly I would add that it is a great first family walk, a worthy summit and has little scrambles ideal for younger children.

View from Gummer's How